Something about mental health.

(Right. You'd think I could have thought to write this one already. Like, last fall, when I was writing "something" every day for my own mental health.) May, as you've likely already seen or heard, is Mental Health Awareness Month. You've likely already seen or heard about it because, thanks to the pandemic, mental health … Continue reading Something about mental health.

Something about writing condolence notes.

Brief, sincere, and tactful. If you remember nothing else from what follows, below, then just remember these three words and you'll do fine. One of the things I've learned from having a small stationery business is that people often are reluctant to write notes because they don't know what to write, or how to express … Continue reading Something about writing condolence notes.

Night must fall. March forward anyway.

During my growing-up years, in the days before widespread cable television, our local CBS affiliate station aired old movies in the afternoons and then again late at night. Among the films I remember watching are these: What Ever Happened to Baby Jane; Hush Hush, Sweet Charlotte; Sunset Boulevard; Sorry, Wrong Number; Rebecca; Dracula; The 39 … Continue reading Night must fall. March forward anyway.

Generations, part three.

The concept of "parenting" is deeply embedded in our modern human culture and language, beyond the walls of family dwellings. In computing, for example, "parent-child" is a term used starting in the mid-1960s to describe data architecture. The "parent" could be a customer record, for example; the "child" would be a sales order for that … Continue reading Generations, part three.

A rose for the boy in Aleppo.

The first hint that something was wrong came from a friend's Facebook post, sharing another friend's status. The gist of the post was this: A splinter group had broken through the security blocks that prohibited web traffic, and they wanted to world to know that terrible things were happening and being hidden, covered up. "People … Continue reading A rose for the boy in Aleppo.